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Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels

August 12, 2013 - Comment

Help your little one learn to ride with the Bell(r) E-Z Trainer(tm) training wheels. Installation is easy: adjust the wheel nuts, slip the hooks over the axles, and you’re ready to go riding! The coiled design lets the bicycle lean slightly during turns. Product Features The Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels feature patented coiled springs to

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(as of January 19, 2018 5:37 pm UTC - Details)

Help your little one learn to ride with the Bell(r) E-Z Trainer(tm) training wheels. Installation is easy: adjust the wheel nuts, slip the hooks over the axles, and you’re ready to go riding! The coiled design lets the bicycle lean slightly during turns.

Product Features

  • The Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels feature patented coiled springs to keep the wheels on the ground all the time
  • Easy to install
  • Fits bikes 12-Inch to 20-Inch

Comments

Eric J. Bly says:

Flexing terror! First, I will say that I did not purchase these from Amazon or any of their partner companies.For those that think these are the types of training wheels we all learned on you are sadly mistaken. They are a spring and they flex, . . .a lot. After I installed them, my daughter got on and the bike flexed at least 20 degrees to either side. Needless to say she freaked out! My daughter would not get back on the bike even with me holding on to it.The springs are way too flexible for a child that is just learning to ride. They might be a good second stage for a child that is extremely comfortable on a bike with standard training wheels. For those with children that are just learning STAY AWAY from this style of training wheels!

den71 says:

Works great for beginning rider We got some hand-me down bikes for my four year olds and they kept having trouble with the more traditional training wheels. On one (traditional kind), a metal fork would keep slipping out of place, causing the wheel to flip upward and the bike to fall over. On the other, the soft metal would bend, so that one wheel would ride progressively higher and my son would become tilted as he rode. I figured the spring-action should resist that problem.Putting on the wheels was fairly simple. The old training wheels were attached so that they were sandwiched between two nuts on the central bolt. With the new training wheels, I simply fitted them right up against the fork of the frame and secured it with a single nut. There is a metal bracket with a small tooth on it that fits right into the fork so that it does not swivel. Therefore, it requires the training wheel to be mounted close (using one bolt, not two). The stem-loop of the wheels slides up and down to adjust for…

PapaEJangles says:

Better than expected I purchased these trainers after attempting to use the “Schwinn Girl Bicycle Training Wheels”. The issues I was looking to resolve were: increased height for a 20″ bike; wheels which can tolerate normal use on sidewalks and pavement; increased stability / able to maintain fixed position when in use.This set actually surprised me in how well it resolved those issues. The wheels are a durable plastic. I would have preferred metal, but the plastic in this construction is neither flimsy nor excessively rigid. Thus, it will flex as needed, and it will not be destroyed by the vibrations of the road. The tires are rubber, or a material that is very similar to it. I feel that this feature makes the overall stability improved substantially.The spring design is very clever, and it is very strong. The configuration appears that it would resist the fatigue other configurations might exhibit over the course of normal child usage, simply because it is designed to flex, while…

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